Tag : violin

The Bow Stops Here — Focus

https://www.marysmale.com/

Be careful to not use the perfect practice concept as an excuse to do nothing out of fear of doing it wrong.  Even if only one thing was learned at the lesson practice that one thing perfectly by staying in focus and in the moment.  You may have to use the forced focus technique described in the book to maintain that focus.

Achieve Energized, Anxiety-Controlled Perfection in Any of Life’s Performances

www.marysmale.com

The Charl Ann Gastineau’s Stop Bow Method, developed for violin students, can be applied to any discipline or endeavor in Life that requires the honing of a skill and/or the reduction of anxiety in performing the endeavor. Mary Smale’s book, The Bow Stops Here, will show you the Gastineau Method and how to apply it to any musical instrument, Aikido or any martial art – anything that requires concentration and skill building.

Rather than “Practice makes perfect.” The wise saying is “What you practice is what you get.” If you practice mistakes, they will rise to the surface in performance settings. The Gastineau Bow Stop method teaches to practice perfection, one note at a time.

Home

Welcome to MarySmale.com

“Math Drawings” creator, Mary Smale, has been a math and art instructor in the Los Angeles area for more than 35 years. She was featured on the popular television show Homework Hotline (on KLCS, a PBS station in Los Angeles) where she donned funny costumes and presented math as it may have been experienced by weird or wonderful characters from history, literature, the news and movies. Such notables as Julius Caesar’s mother-in-law, Jackie Chan’s grandmother, Jack’s mother from “Jack and the Beanstalk,” a fading rock star, a stressed- out telemarketer, a goofy geologist, an inept caterer, a frustrated teacher, and Whistlers Mother from the famous portrait by James Whistler, were among her most popular characters. But audience response soared whenever she taught with her Math Drawings –so much so that eventually her fellow teachers urged her to compile all the drawings and instructions into this book. She is a mother, grandmother, and is the widow of the renowned jazz pianist and music arranger, Bob Smale, who was and is a pianist on the Lawrence Welk TV show, which is one of the longest continuous-running TV shows in the world – 61 years and counting. Her book, Math Drawings: Good Stuff for Teachers, Parents, and Students, is in its Fifth Edition. She lives in the San Fernando Valley and continues to teach, draw, and write.

Watch the videos here!

Math drawing Mary Smale

Math Drawings

The Bow Stops Here

 

Gastineau Stop Bow Method Adds to the Suzuki Method

https://www.marysmale.com/

Charl Ann Gastineau, lifelong violinist and teacher, developed the Stop Bow Method on the foundation of Dr. Suzuki’s ear-training approach, to aid her students in learning to read music as well as hearing it. She was able to have each student slowly identify the note to be played and match the written note with the position on the violin. Then, the student played the series of notes slowly – even stopping the bow — for many lessons, concentrating on accuracy and correctness, rather than speed. The speed came later and since the accuracy had been built up over time, there were no mistakes in the muscle-brain connection that might arise in performance. This decreased anxiety and nervousness due to fear of mistakes. All the Stop Bow student has to do is play the piece as practiced – perfectly!

Achieve Energized, Anxiety-Controlled Perfection in Any of Life’s Performances

The Charl Ann Gastineau’s Stop Bow Method, developed for violin students, can be applied to any discipline or endeavor in Life that requires the honing of a skill and/or the reduction of anxiety in performing the endeavor. Mary Smale’s book, The Bow Stops Here, will show you the Gastineau Method and how to apply it to any musical instrument, any martial art – anything that requires concentration and skill building.

Gastineau states: “There is a kaleidoscope of approaches to teaching a student to play

an instrument. I use the Suzuki Method for a myriad of reasons, and to it I’ve added my Stop Bow Method to further reduce mistake-driven anxieties. I’m constantly adding to my curriculum, especially when I find something that works well for another teacher. We all learn from each other, and should always be open to new ideas.”

In “typical” practice sessions, a musical student unwittingly practices mistakes as well as the correct execution. Gastineau observed that 90 percent of her “teaching” time was correcting mistakes and telling students to slow down.  She developed two lists, one of Potential Mistakes and  the other, Elements of Aggravation. She surmised that since athletes train by performing their motions very slowly, to develop the muscle-brain connection properly, playing an instrument should be approached in the same way. This was the “aha” behind her Stop Bow Method. Rather than hurrying through the playing of a piece, with the Stop Bow Method, the student avoids playing mistakes altogether and practices the piece of music very slowly for a significant period of time. With concentrated, dedicated practice, virtually anyone can reach a level of anxiety-free performance applying the Gastineau Stop Bow Method.